XLC4 LED controller

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New from Chromasens is the XLC4 LED controller, which prevents fluctuations in brightness levels that lower line-scan camera performance.

High-quality controllers are required for the successful operation of LED line-scan illuminators used in the machine vision inspection of materials such as color documents, food products, semiconductors, steel, flat panel displays, and pharmaceuticals. If an LED controller is not stable in terms of temperature variations or supply current to the LEDs, brightness changes can significantly lower line-scan sensor performance and make material inspection impossible.

To meet this challenge, Chromasens offers its XLC4 LED Controller that serves as an external power supply with adjustable current to control brightness. It ensures the optimal spectral behavior of LEDs by delivering high continuous power of 80 watts per channel and preventing brightness variations in the images. Its flash is capable of an extremely fast 60 kHz, plus the controller can monitor temperature for fan or water cooling.

The XLC4 unit is controlled by a set of simple ASCII-commands, independent of the selected electrical interface type. Therefore it is easy to control the XLC4 from any user application with access to either RS232, RS485, USB or Ethernet. This lets the user quickly adjust the light output remotely since different materials may need to be inspected on the same production line but require different light levels.

Chromasens designed its XLC4 LED Controller with an ultra compact footprint so that it can be readily integrated into new or existing systems utilizing the Chromasens Corona II LED illuminator or third party models.

A tunable LED light source offers spectral reproduction. Credit: Pro-Lite Technology

08 June 2021

From left: Wenglor MD Rafael Baur; TPL Vision MD Daniel Huber; and head of the computer vision business unit Christian Vollrath. Credit: Wenglor

27 September 2021

A tunable LED light source offers spectral reproduction. Credit: Pro-Lite Technology

08 June 2021

In a public area, LEDs could be used for general lighting, visible light communication and 3D video surveillance. Credit: Emma Le Francois, University of Strathclyde

25 January 2021