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SIL-3 image intensifier systems

Specialised Imaging announces the new SIL-3 range of high resolution, high gain gated image intensifier systems designed to improve the sensitivity of high-speed video and image converter cameras in applications including life science microscopy, combustion research, machine vision and luminescence studies.

Extensive triggering facilities allow the SIL-3 to be readily interfaced to most manufacturers high-speed cameras, and in particular to high-speed video systems. Constructed around high gain microchannel plate image intensifiers, these units provide a wide range of sensitivity, gain and resolution options to satisfy even the most demanding imaging applications.

A quartz input window enables the SIL-3 to capture events that emit radiation at the shorter wavelengths of the UV region right through to the near infrared. Triggered synchronously at high speed, the image intensifiers allow fast framing rates (up to 1,000,000 frames per second) and short exposure times (down to 50ns) for investigating rapidly evolving, low-light processes. An integral mechanical capping shutter is included to provide additional protection for the sensitive image intensifier.

The comprehensive range of operating parameters are programmed from the intuitive local keypad or from a remote PC via Ethernet link, which also allows archiving and loading of timing set-ups.

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