SW-4010Q-MCL prism-based RGB-SWIR line scan camera

Share this on social media:

JAI is announcing a new industrial prism-based line scan camera. The new camera model (SW-4010Q-MCL) features 4-sensor line scan technology that allows for simultaneous collection of red, green and blue image data on three separate CMOS sensors plus a fourth sensor that collects image data from the short wave infrared (SWIR) spectrum using a sensor based on indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) technology. The new SW-4010Q-MCL model joins JAI´s existing Sweep+ Series of 3-CMOS R-G-B and 4-CMOS R-G-B-NIR line scan cameras thereby expanding multispectral imaging to the SWIR electromagnetic waveband.

In machine vision systems where there is a requirement for imaging using both visible and SWIR light to ensure required quality levels, the SW-4010Q-MCL camera delivers visible/SWIR images in a single inspection routine. Combining CMOS and InGaAs image sensors in the same industrial camera makes it possible to perform advanced color inspection collecting visible light data (from 400 ~ 700 nm) via the three CMOS sensors, while at the same time obtaining image data via the fourth InGaAs sensor from light waves in the 800 nm ~ 1700 nm range.

Each of the three CMOS line sensors has a resolution of 4096 pixels, a pixel size of 7.5 µm x 7.5 µm, a sensor width of 30.72 mm, and a maximum scan rate of 20.6 kHz in full resolution. In comparison, the InGaAs line sensor provides a resolution of 1024 pixels, 25 µm square pixels, a sensor width of 25.6 mm, and a full resolution scan rate of 39 kHz.

By using a special version of JAI’s pixel rescaling function (Xscale), the camera can be easily reconfigured such that all four sensors have the same field-of-view (line width of 25.6 mm) and the same scan rate (39 kHz), with the resolution of the visible channels automatically rescaled to either 2048 pixels (12.5 µm pixels) or 1024 pixels (25 µm pixels).

The SW-4010Q-MCL has a built-in color conversion function that allows the color output to be provided in HSI or CIE XYZ color format if needed, as well as offering conversions from standard RGB to the sRGB or Adobe RGB color spaces, or even to a user-defined custom RGB conversion matrix.

Other features include individual gain and shutter control for each of the four channels, dual-stream data output (RGB and SWIR in separate data streams), trigger and encoder control, and noise reduction filters, to name a few.

JAI also provides a special lens (sold separately) that is optimized to handle both visible and SWIR light. The camera is equipped with a dual Mini Camera Link interface and an M52 lens mount.

Image: atdigit/shutterstock.com

14 November 2022

Jyrki Rosenberg (left) and Tapani Ryhänen, Emberion’s CEO and CTO respectively. Credit: Emberion

24 January 2022

Image credit: Oleksiy Mark/Shutterstock.com

23 May 2022

When combined with air drying, shortwave-infrared can be used to detect active dental cavities. This is possible because active cavities are porous and hold more water, which affects the infrared measurements around the affected area as the tooth dries. (Image: Chang et al.)

20 January 2023

The prototype SWIR 3D camera operates at 1,130nm wavelength, making it a good fit for outdoor sensing applications (Image: Jabil)

19 January 2023