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SLC-100P camera

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Videor has released the SLC-100P camera from its Solvido range. The camera is fitted with a Digital Pixel System (DPS) technology and is ideal for monitoring automated welding procedures.

Monitoring automated welding is important in order to be able to immediately intervene in the event of errors and avoid waste. High demands are made on the camera technology used for monitoring automated welding procedures. Apart from the harsh industrial environment, which means the camera needs a sturdy casing, the greatest demand is the extremely bright light that can results in a blurred video image in a white beam of light.

The SLC-100P was specifically developed for such applications. It has a sturdy aluminium casing and a Pixim DPS sensor, which takes outstanding pictures in environments with extremely bright light sources and high contrast. The DPS technology developed and patented by the American company, Pixim and Stanford University, organises 388,800 pixels to act as a continuous self-regulating, individual camera. Contrary to conventional camera technology, which only digitises pictures after a series of processing operations, with the DPS technology the image is digitised immediately thanks to the integration of an A/D converter on each individual pixel of the sensor. Thus the chip can assign an optimal exposure time to each individual pixel. This significantly extends the dynamic range of the camera, which is currently measured at 120dB.

Further advantages of this technology are: low blooming (blooming is a bright pixel produced by a load overflow into the neighbouring pixels, which appear as bright marks on the screen) and no smear effect.

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