PRESS RELEASE
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ROD-1/360°/720° dual-lens spherical camera

CEVA, a licensor of signal processing IP for smarter, connected devices, and Evomotion Technology, a provider of deep learning and computer vision combining hardware solutions, announced that the companies have collaborated to enable advanced imaging and computer vision features for Evomotion’s ROD-1/360°/720° dual-lens spherical camera. The ROD-1 is capable of taking 3k resolution 30fps videos and 4k resolution photos with panoramic stitching in real-time, implemented on the CEVA-XM4 imaging and vision DSP, eliminating the need for post-processing on a smartphone or PC. The camera is now available and is one of the best value 360 degree cameras in the market today. A YouTube video introducing the ROD-1 can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39asfnXNQs0.

The camera utilizes Rockchip RV1108 visual processors, which include the CEVA-XM4 DSP to handle advanced imaging and computer vision tasks. Evomotion ported a range of imaging algorithms and high-performance stitching to the fully-programmable CEVA-XM4 using CEVA’s development environment and tools, supported by CEVA and Rockchip engineers. Following this successful project, CEVA and Evomotion intend to extend the partnership to include broader imaging solutions for dashcam, sports camera, SLAM and real-time 3D reconstruction in the future.

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