Teledyne Dalsa to develop multispectral sensor for Earth observation satellite

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Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL), a provider of operational and commercial satellite programmes, is developing an advanced Earth observation satellite incorporating a multispectral sensor from Teledyne Dalsa. The multimillion dollar development project is expected to begin delivering high resolution images during 2014.

The Earth observation application will utilise the DMC3 satellite constellation. The multispectral sensors developed by Teledyne Dalsa will allow SSTL's subsidiary company and client, DMC International Imaging, to acquire high resolution data for applications such as urban planning and environment and disaster monitoring.

'We are very pleased that SSTL has chosen to award Teledyne Dalsa this prestigious contract,' said Philip Colet, VP of sales and marketing at Teledyne Dalsa. 'We are confident that our experience with designs optimised for radiation hardness and extreme environments typical in space will give SSTL and its customer a competitive advantage.'

Teledyne Dalsa's multispectral imaging solutions draw on its long experience in leading edge design, fabrication and packaging technologies. A single device can contain multiple imaging areas tailored to different multispectral bandwidths in a highly cost-effective and reliable package.

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