Mexican postal operator installs automated sorting system

Share this on social media:

A major postal and logistics operator in Mexico has selected an automated parcel sorting system from Prime Vision. Prime Vision will install its ParcelMatch automation platform along with a series of process modules. Installation and commissioning of the new facility is scheduled for the fourth quarter of 2012.

ParcelMatch is a second generation product for parcel processing. Thanks to its open system design it offers revenue protection, off-shoring and smart cloud options that can integrate multiple vendor OCRs. It can be tailored to the precise needs of the customer thanks to its modularity.

The Mexican installation will initially integrate Prime Vision’s Key-IT video coding module that processes manual coding requests at speed. High flexibility is assured as these requests can be generated locally, centrally or via cloud. ParcelMatch can also be upgraded at any time to incorporate the Read-IT recognition solution for identifying addresses, printed or handwritten information and indicia.

Other options open to the Mexican customer is Archive-IT image archive, the reporting package Report-IT, the Process-IT scalable semi-automated workstation, for items that require some manual intervention and Monitor-IT, Prime Vision’s GUI onto the complete parcel processing operation.

Recent News

29 July 2020

The Perseverance rover contains 19 cameras, including seven scientific instruments. It will analyse the climate and geology of Mars, looking for signs of past life, as well as monitoring the Martian atmosphere

02 July 2020

Norwegian seafood firm, Lerøy, has installed hyperspectral cameras on processing lines to sort fish. The system is able to measure the amount of blood in white fish, which gives a grade of quality

09 June 2020

Hyperspectral imaging is being used in a research programme at hospitals in Maryland and New York to investigate the prognostic value of skin findings associated with Covid-19 infection

27 May 2020

The composite picture of The Night Watch, made of 528 exposures stitched together digitally, makes it possible to zoom in on individual brushstrokes and even particles of pigment in the painting