Dalsa secures $3m order for flat panel inspection

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Dalsa has recently secured an order valued at more than $3m (Canadian) for inspection equipment to be used in a new Asia-Pacific flat panel display factory. The order includes Dalsa's flagship high performance line scan cameras and frame grabbers, with the delivery of the majority of these multiple hundreds of units scheduled for the first half of 2011.

Dalsa claims that its high performance inspection products inspect almost all of the world's flat panel displays, from small mobile devices to large television screens. With 400 million older CRT televisions still in use in China and ripe for upgrade to flat panels, television manufacturers are building factories in order to be close to this market and reduce costs.

'This latest order underlines our continued strength in digital imaging sales in 2010,' commented Brian Doody, CEO of Dalsa. 'Activity in the flat panel display capital equipment market has been very brisk this year, but I am pleased to report that we are seeing strong sales across a wide range of markets, including life science imaging and general machine vision. Some of this activity has been driven by pent up demand following last year's slump, but even as our customers settle back into more stable purchase levels, our digital imaging outlook for the remainder of the year is very positive.'

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