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Parameters​ ​of​ ​3D​ ​sensing​ ​techniques​ ​in​ ​a​ ​nutshell

Machine Vision is one of the driving forces of industrial automation. For a long time, it’s been primarily pushed forward by improvements made in 2D image sensing and, for some applications, 2D sensing is still an optimal tool to solve a problem. But the majority of challenges machine vision is facing today has a 3D character. From well-established metrology up to new applications in smart robotics, 3D sensors serve as a main source of data. Here, we discuss the parameters of 3D sensing techniques.

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Cliff Cheng, senior director of automotive marketing at OmniVision Technologies, details its latest global shutter sensor for industrial and automotive imaging

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Harald Neubauer, Jürgen Ernst and Dr Michael Schöberl at Fraunhofer IIS describe the team’s prototype polarisation camera, which was presented at Image Sensors Europe in London in March

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Albert Theuwissen, founder of Harvest Imaging, outlines a project to classify performance characteristics of CMOS image sensors

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Matthew Dale explores how online supermarket Ocado is using 3D vision to automate its warehouses

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Sebastien Frasse-Sombet, product line manager at Sofradir, on new, more affordable SWIR detectors

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Andrew Williams explores the latest imaging technologies for traffic monitoring, including how AI could be used to make sense of all that data

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Chinese automation from Anne Wendel, director of VDMA Machine Vision; Paul Wilson talks about self-driving delivery robots at the UKIVA Machine Vision Conference; and Thomas Lübkemeier updates on the EMVA's events calendar

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After presenting at Image Sensors Europe in London, Dr Piet De Moor, senior business development manager, imagers at Imec, discusses a multispectral time delay and integration image sensor based on CCD-in-CMOS technology

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Michael DeLuca, industrial solutions division of On Semiconductor, on the image sensor technology needs for machine vision

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Greg Blackman looks at novel imaging devices based on quantum science, and finds that the technology is closer to commercialisation than first expected