VS20 VIS-SWIR 400-2,000nm camera

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Emberion has recently launched its VIS-SWIR 400-2000 nm camera and will be showcasing the product "Emberion VS20" at Photonics West 2022 (Booth 5319). Apart from wide spectral range it also offers high dynamic range with target applications in machine vision, surveillance, optical sorting (e.g. plastic recycling & food sorting) and enables hyperspectral imaging. Also automotive sensing and medical imaging are relevant application areas. Our cameras are now available for evaluation and order and to be explored by the customers for their applications.

Beyond the current camera, Emberion offers a very dense roadmap where higher spectral resolution to 2500nm, mega-pixel densities and frame rates up to 400fps will be released over the near term. Already during 1st half of 2022 Emberion will start to offer high speed 400fps cameras for optical sorting and other markets needing the speed. Its the ROIC will allow to switch from its linear and non-linear mode instantly for taking advantage of its high dynamic range operation. Additionally, Emberion is also developing an ultra broadband solution that will cover VIS-SWIR-MWIR for simultaneous imaging in order to enable broadband surveillance and hyperspectral imaging.

Jyrki Rosenberg (left) and Tapani Ryhänen, Emberion’s CEO and CTO respectively. Credit: Emberion

24 January 2022

Jyrki Rosenberg (left) and Tapani Ryhänen, Emberion’s CEO and CTO respectively. Credit: Emberion

24 January 2022

Image: Martial Red/shutterstock.com

20 January 2022

Paweł Malinowski, program manager at Imec

15 December 2021

Images taken with STMicroelectronics' 940nm NIR Quantum Film sensor (top left) and with its 1,400nm SWIR QF sensor (bottom left). Corresponding images taken using a visible smartphone camera (right). The QF NIR image shows better contrast between black electrical wires hidden in the dark green leaves, and tree trunks and branches hidden in front of the dark wood fence. The SWIR QF image shows how effective it is to use SWIR imaging to see through a silicon wafer. Credit: STMicroelectronics

15 December 2021