Phoenix QVGA SWIR camera

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Attollo Engineering (www.attolloengineering.com), global engineering experts and suppliers of infrared imaging, LiDAR/LADAR, and laser sensing solutions, introduces a quarter-VGA format camera (320 x 256 resolution), based on indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) shortwave infrared technology. The miniature Phoenix QVGA SWIR Camera is available at an industry-leading low-cost of $4900 (camera core with parallel output). Featuring the smallest SWIR sensor available, the innovative camera is superior for applications that require low size, weight, and power (low-SWaP).

The affordable new Phoenix QVGA is specially designed for applications that require cost-efficiency at the system level, when compared to competing shortwave infrared imagers. The lightweight (only 23 g without lens) SWIR camera captures snapshot imagery utilizing a high-performance InGaAs detector with an extremely small 5-micron pixel pitch that enables a short focal-length optic.

Other features include a global shutter with integrate then read (ITR) capabilities, and a minimum of 100 ns integration time with presets and user-defined options. The spectral response spans a range from 1.0 µm to 1.65 µm. Camera Link or USB-C outputs and a selection of lenses are also available, at additional charge.

Attollo Engineering’s new low-cost Phoenix QVGA SWIR camera is ideal for use in drones or other small gimbal applications. It is also well-suited for laboratory applications, optical fiber alignment tasks, precision agriculture, driver vision enhancement (DVE), microscopy, machine vision, and any other SWIR imaging applications that require a small footprint.

To view the data sheet for the new economical Phoenix QVGA (320 x 256 pixel array) SWIR Camera, please go here.

Jyrki Rosenberg (left) and Tapani Ryhänen, Emberion’s CEO and CTO respectively. Credit: Emberion

24 January 2022

Jyrki Rosenberg (left) and Tapani Ryhänen, Emberion’s CEO and CTO respectively. Credit: Emberion

24 January 2022

Image: Martial Red/shutterstock.com

20 January 2022

Paweł Malinowski, program manager at Imec

15 December 2021

Images taken with STMicroelectronics' 940nm NIR Quantum Film sensor (top left) and with its 1,400nm SWIR QF sensor (bottom left). Corresponding images taken using a visible smartphone camera (right). The QF NIR image shows better contrast between black electrical wires hidden in the dark green leaves, and tree trunks and branches hidden in front of the dark wood fence. The SWIR QF image shows how effective it is to use SWIR imaging to see through a silicon wafer. Credit: STMicroelectronics

15 December 2021