PRESS RELEASE

Ninox 1280

Raptor Photonics, a global leader in the design and manufacture of high performance digital cameras has launched an additional member to its family of Visible SWIR cameras with the Ninox 1280, offering HD resolution for high end scientific and astronomy applications. 

Using a 1280 x 1024 InGaAs sensor from SCD, cooled to -15°C, the Ninox 1280 offers visible extension from 0.4µm to 1.7µm to enable high sensitivity imaging. It will offer less than 40 electrons readout noise combined with one of the lowest dark current readings on the market. The camera will offer ultra-high intrascene dynamic range of 69dB enabling simultaneous capture of bright & dark portions of a scene. 

Available with a 12-bit CameraLink output, the Ninox 1280 will run up to 60Hz. The camera will feature On-board Automated Gain Control (AGC) which will enable the best contrast image from low light to bright as well as an on-board intelligent 3 point Non-Uniform Correction (NUC) algorithm providing the highest quality images. The Ninox 1280 is cooled to -15ºC offering both TEC and water-cooling options, significantly reducing dark current and enabling longer exposures. 

Raptor VP of Sales & Marketing Mark Donaghy comments “Our customers have been asking for higher resolution FPAs for some time. The Ninox 1280 puts Raptor at the forefront of high resolution sensitive InGaAs camera technology. We see a range of applications that can be used with the Ninox 1280 including astronomy, medical and in-vivo imaging applications.” 

The camera come with a range of analysis software including XCAP and Micromanager and a standard CameraLink frame grabber (EPIX).

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