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LMI Gocator

A new measurement tool has been added to the LMI Gocator range of 3D smart cameras, available from Stemmer Imaging. The tool improves the accuracy of height and volume measurements on packages that travel along a conveyor belt in a random orientation. This new Rotated Box tool works in conjunction with the Gocator whole part measurement capability.

Whole part measurement is ideally suited to production line environments. It involves capturing a sequence of laser profiles, identifying discrete objects, and measuring the properties of those objects, such as volume or maximum height. Multiple measurements can be performed on each object. Volumetric measurements such as volume, centroid, orientation, etc can be made to provide important information on packaging lines such as dimensions, location, and orientation.

The whole part measurement process is achieved by automatically detecting the start and end point of a single or multiple components travelling along the conveyor. The new Rotated Box tool makes it possible to measure an object accurately in whole part mode even if it is not perpendicular to the laser line during scanning. It can be used to measure the orientation angle, width and height of boxes in packaging applications if the boxes are not be precisely lined up as they come down the line.

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