PRESS RELEASE

Harrier interface board

Active Silicon are pleased to launch our new Harrier interface board in 75 Ohm and 50 Ohm variations, offering long-reach, real-time HD digital and analog video transmission for the Tamron MP1010M-VC and MP1110M-VC cameras, as well as various Sony FCB and other autofocus zoom cameras. Fitting perfectly to the side of the camera, the Harrier interface board provides a cost-effective solution to take full advantage of the high definition digital video output, providing superior image quality and supporting all the 3G-SDI and HD-SDI modes of the camera up to 2.97 Gbps. In addition, the interface board can provide simultaneous analog output of Standard Definition (SD) video in 720p50/60 modes in switchable 4:3 or 16:9 aspect ratios for distortion-free display. Other features include a built-in test pattern which conforms to the SMPTE RP-219-2002 specification, and HD Visually Lossless Compression (HD-VLC™), allowing much greater cable lengths.

This board revolutionizes the transmission of digital video, allowing cable lengths not reached before, and even accommodates the addition of multiple slip rings. Tests with compatible hardware have proven HD-VLC™ (HD) video transmission over coax cable in excess of 700m, twisted pair cable over 150m, and many kilometers with optical cables. The product has been developed with the pipe inspection market in mind but is ideal for a range of applications including general industrial inspection, management of gas and nuclear facilities and surveillance.

Due to its compact size, the Harrier Board is the only video interface board which, in combination with small autofocus zoom cameras, can replace legacy Sony FCB camera systems without requiring any significant mechanical changes to the existing enclosure. Therefore, it is an ideal component in the replacement of Sony FCB modules which have reached end-of-life status.

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