NEWS

A laser system of note

A non-contact laser triangulation sensor from Micro-Epsilon is helping a German University create melodies and rhythms by scanning the shape of everyday objects.

University of the Arts Bremen (Hochschule für Künste Bremen) is using Micro-Epsilon’s optoNCDT laser triangulation sensor to develop a musical instrument. This instrument consists of a rotation mechanism and the optoNCDT laser triangulation sensor.

Everyday objects are clamped into the device and revolve around their axis, with a laser sensor scanning these objects as they rotate. The distance measurement data from the sensor is then translated into acoustic frequencies and output via loudspeakers.

The instrument can ‘play’ a wide variety of everyday objects, whose silhouettes directly determine the melody and rhythm. Professor Dennis Paul, from the university, explains: 'Playing this instrument requires a mixture of practice, intuition and coincidence.'

Micro-Epsilon’s optoNCDT series of laser triangulation sensors are normally used by industrial plants for non-contact distance, displacement, profile and position measurement tasks.

Laser triangulation is based on a geometric triangular relationship. A laser diode projects a visible point of light onto the surface of the object being measured. The back scattered light reflected from this point is then projected onto a CCD array by a high quality optical lens system. This forms a triangle between laser diode, measurement spot on the target object’s surface and the CCD array.

If the target changes position with respect to the sensor, the movement of the reflected light is projected on the CCD array and analysed to output the exact position of the target. The measurements are processed digitally in the integral controller and then converted into a scaled output.

Twitter icon
Google icon
Del.icio.us icon
Digg icon
LinkedIn icon
Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Feature

Rob Ashwell looks at the advances being made in scientific image sensors and how these are furthering our understanding of the brain

Feature

Shigeki Masumura, president and CEO of Machine Vision Lighting, and winner of the 2016 Vision Award

Feature

Recycling is becoming big business, and hyperspectral cameras are exactly the right tool to help sort the growing volumes of waste, as Matthew Dale discovers

Feature

Greg Blackman gets to the bottom of Industry 4.0, and asks how machine vision will fit into the factories of the future

Feature

Smart Vision Lights has built its company, originally from designing custom illumination, as Greg Blackman finds out