NEWS
Tags: 

European project to adapt autonomous vehicle sensors into wearable detection device

A three-year European collaborative project, Inspex, which aims to develop a wearable obstacle-detection system based on autonomous vehicle technology, has begun. The portable device could aid in smart manufacturing, guide robotic drones and assist the visually impaired. 

The Inspex system will first be demonstrated inside a white cane for the visually impaired. (Credit: Leti)

Coordinated by Leti, a technology research institute of CEA Tech, and drawing on the expertise and technologies of nine partners, the Inspex system will employ lidar, UWB radar and MEMS ultrasound sensors to detect 3D obstacles in real-time, even in harsh weather conditions. Inspex will miniaturise and reduce the power consumption of each element to ease their integration in the new system. 

The sensors will be co-integrated with an inertial measurement unit, environmental sensing, signal and data processing, and power efficient data fusion within a miniature, low-power system designed to operate within Internet of Things environments.

‘Sophisticated obstacle-detection systems, such as those in autonomous vehicles, are typically large and heavy, have high power consumption and require large computational capabilities,’ said Suzanne Lesecq, project coordinator at Leti. ‘The Inspex team will work together to miniaturise and adapt this technology for individual and personal applications, which will require even greater capability for all-conditions obstacle detection. The project is a strong example of European innovation to bring leading-edge technology to a broader segment of users.’

The system will be demonstrated initially inside a white cane for the visually impaired, providing 3D spatial audio feedback on obstacle location. The Inspex system is also expected to have applications in human mobility, instrumentation and smart factories.

Project Partners

Leti, the University of Manchester, Cork Institute of Technology, STMicroelectronics, Swiss Center for Electronics and Microtechnology CSEM, Tyndall National Institute University College Cork, University of Namur ASBL, GoSense and SensL Technologies.

Other tags: 
Company: 
Twitter icon
Google icon
Del.icio.us icon
Digg icon
LinkedIn icon
Reddit icon
e-mail icon
Feature

Greg Blackman explores the latest advances made in scientific CMOS sensors and asks whether CCDs still have a place in life science imaging

Feature

Denis Bulgin speaks to Mark Williamson and David Hearn, who both started their own vision companies in the UK 20 years ago and are both now at Stemmer Imaging

Feature

Matthew Dale investigates a new class of highly-efficient image sensor that’s just starting to find its way onto the commercial market, all based on the principles of biological sight

Feature

Andrew Williams on the uses and current state of hyperspectral imaging, along with the technique’s potential as an industrial inspection tool

Feature

Stemmer Imaging’s series of technology days included talks from various lens manufacturers. Here, we round up some of what was discussed at the event

Feature

Greg Blackman charts the meteoric rise of Chinese firm Hikvision, one of the top suppliers of video surveillance equipment that has now turned its sights on industrial vision