Euresys acquires FPGA experts Sensor to Image

Share this on social media:

Euresys, a manufacturer of image and video acquisition components, has acquired Sensor to Image, a specialist in OEM imaging IP and hardware for standard industrial vision products such as cameras and frame grabbers.

Claude Latin - Euresys COO, Werner Feith - Sensor to Image, Marc Damhaut, Euresys CEO - Jean-Bernard De Bal - VP of business development, Jean-Michel Wintgens, VP of engineering. (Image: Euresys and Sensor to Image) 

‘The purchase of Sensor to Image, based in Schongau, Germany, further increases Euresys' technological assets and development capabilities,’ said Marc Damhaut, CEO of Euresys. ‘Sensor to Image and Euresys are leaders of standard imaging hardware and software, we are happy to combine our forces.’

Sensor to Image provides GenICam interface FPGA cores to 100 customers worldwide, which are used in 10,000 products every year. Based on this FPGA expertise, Sensor to Image also designs, produces and delivers customised OEM solutions.

The company will continue to operate under its own name despite now being a wholly owned subsidiary of Euresys. ‘Our clients will continue to receive the same high level of service, which they have come to expect’, stated Werner Feith, founder of Sensor to Image. Werner Feith will continue to lead Sensor to Image.

Related news

Recent News

23 April 2019

Journalist Andy Wilson, the founding editor of Vision Systems Design, has died on 7 April. Wilson’s career reporting on industrial imaging spanned more than 30 years

12 April 2019

Gom’s technology, which includes non-contact 3D sensors and scanners for surface metrology, will now be part of Zeiss’s industrial metrology and quality assurance portfolio

03 April 2019

David Dechow (pictured), Edward Roney, Ghislain Beaupré, and Jeremy Bergh have been elected to serve two-year terms on the board of directors of AIA, the Association for Advancing Vision and Imaging

02 April 2019

A campaign to raise awareness among young people about careers in engineering has drawn up a list of seven technologies rarely recognised as feats of engineering