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Edmund Optics fires up $2.32m contract

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Edmund Optics (EO) has signed a $2.32m contract in federal funding to improve manufacturing technology for infrared (IR) aspheric optics.

The new Army funding will be used to help achieve superior contrast and clarity on the battlefield during extremely low light and environmentally challenged viewing situations, allowing both foot soldiers and defensive weapons guidance systems to effectively ‘see in the dark.’ The funding, part of the US Army's RDT&E, Weapons and Advanced Technology Program, recognises that future night vision technology requires a blend of both near- and far-infrared channels that are fused into a digitally stabilised image, at significantly reduced costs compared to what is currently available today. 

The work will be conducted under Edmund Optics' Precision Molding and Manufacturing Technology for Infrared Aspheric Molding proposal.  Infrared imaging technology is the only viable solution that can help both human soldiers and precision guidance systems to effectively see in total darkness and extremely dense fog and smoke.  When integrated into such tools as night vision goggles and precision munitions guidance systems, they make possible new capabilities that enable our soldiers on the ground to detect and identify threats, and then engage and defeat the enemy at safe distances.

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