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Edmund Optics celebrates 75th anniversary

Edmund Optics has celebrated its 75th anniversary this year.

The company was founded as Edmund Salvage in 1942, receiving surplus optical supplies from the US army in Philadelphia to repair and sell. At this time, founder Norman Edmund priced a pcx lens at 10 cents and an achromat at 25 cents.

The first Edmund Scientific catalogue was released in 1943, and since then the company has provided supplies for the space race in the 1950s and 1960s, and the 95 cent Barlow lens used in a colour camera on the Apollo 11 lunar mission. In the 1980s, Edmund Scientific split into Edmund Scientific and Edmund Industrial Optics.

Edmund Optics has been on the cutting edge with telecentric optics introduced in the late 90s, new manufacturing capabilities in 2000 with high precision spherical components, optical prisms and high quality optical coatings, as well as optical quality ensured by optical testing.

Today, Edmund Optics can provide λ/20 accuracy optical flats, spherical optics and high precision, spherical aberration corrected aspheres. The innovative Cx series lenses with a user-adjustable mid-section has interchangeable accessories including filters, apertures and liquid lenses.
 
‘We're very excited to be celebrating our 75th anniversary! It has been a long tradition of customer service and support in optics. At Edmund Optics, we believe that the future of the world depends on optics. Edmund Optics is ready to take these challenges by developing new technologies such as aspheric lenses and laser optics coatings to continue that tradition and to pave the way for the future,’ commented Marisa Edmund, executive vice president of global sales and marketing at Edmund Optics.

The company has 800 employees around the world, with manufacturing in the United States, Japan, Singapore, and Southern China, as well as sales offices in Europe. It supplies more than 28,900 products.

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