Thanks for visiting Imaging and Machine Vision Europe.

You're trying to access an editorial feature that is only available to logged in, registered users of Imaging and Machine Vision Europe. Registering is completely free, so why not sign up with us?

By registering, as well as being able to browse all content on the site without further interruption, you'll also have the option to receive our magazine (multiple times a year) and our email newsletters.

Global shutter for ADAS

Share this on social media:

Topic tags: 

Cliff Cheng, senior director of automotive marketing at OmniVision Technologies, details its latest global shutter sensor for industrial and automotive imaging

OmniVision Technologies has for years been developing CMOS image sensors with global shutter operation for a wide variety of markets, including surveillance, industrial machine vision applications, and more recently automotive-grade machine vision and viewing applications.

The OV2311 image sensor is among OmniVision’s latest offerings for advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) applications like driver monitoring. It features the OmniPixel3-GS global shutter technology with 3µm pixel pitch, and comes in a compact, 7.219mm x 6.157mm automotive chip-scale package that is Automotive Safety Integrity Level (ASIL) B and AEC-Q100 qualified.

The sensor can operate at a maximum resolution of 2 megapixels, providing 1,600 x 1,300 at 60fps, 1,280 x 720 at 90fps or 640 x 480 at 180fps, depending on the configuration. The OV2311 also has a PWM output for control and synchronisation with an external IR LED, which enables in-cabin monitoring in dark operating conditions. Additionally, this image sensor is equipped with many safety features, such as Watch Dog pulse and a calibrated temperature sensor.

Cameras that operate using a global shutter sensor do not suffer from motion distortion – as can be the case when capturing live video of moving objects using rolling shutter sensors – because all of the pixels for the entire image frame are exposed at the same time.

Rolling shutter artefacts result from the nature of rolling shutter operation, where each line of a frame is exposed sequentially at a different time, causing a temporal shift between lines. For many applications that require distortion-free images, in terms of shape and pattern, the highly noticeable distortion in moving rolling shutter images is unacceptable and unusable. For example, machine vision applications such as barcode scanning, package inspection, face recognition for automotive driver monitoring systems, and augmented and virtual reality devices, to name a few, all have zero tolerance for motion distortion artefacts.

Company: 

Related features and analysis & opinion

Test image at 940nm

21 May 2019

Imec is working to industrialise thin-film photodetector stacks on CMOS in order to fabricate low-cost infrared image sensors, as the Belgian institute’s Dr Paweł Malinowski explains

29 March 2019

Greg Blackman speaks to Sofradir about its €150 million investment to advance infrared sensor technology

28 March 2019

Greg Blackman reports from the Image Sensors Europe conference in London, which took place from 13 to 14 March

22 February 2019

Ron Low, Framos head of sales Americas and APAC, reports from Framos Tech Days at Photonics West in San Francisco where Sony Japan representatives presented image sensor roadmap updates

19 February 2019

Greg Blackman reports on CEA Leti's new image sensor, shown at Photonics West, which contains onboard processing and is able to image at 5,500 frames per second

26 July 2019

As car makers install production lines for electric vehicles, Greg Blackman looks at how vision is currently used in their factories

20 June 2019

The UK is up to 20 per cent less productive than its major competitor countries because it is not investing in automation, Mike Wilson at the British Automation and Robot Association said at UKIVA's machine vision conference in Milton Keynes. Greg Blackman reports

05 April 2019

Greg Blackman reports on the complexities of training AllGo Systems' driver monitoring neural networks, which the firm's VP of engineering, Nirmal Kumar Sancheti, spoke about at the Embedded World trade fair