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USB3 Vision progresses at AIA standards meeting

USB3 Vision was the main topic of discussion at the AIA Winter 2012 Vision Standards Meeting, which was hosted by Point Grey in Vancouver, Canada, 13-17 February. A total of 29 leading industry players from 22 companies met to continue development on interface standards.

After reviewing the results of the work done since the USB3 Vision kickoff meeting in Ahrensburg, Germany in September 2011, the session focused on making core decisions about the design of the standard. Decisions regarding device discovery and control, event handling and data streaming were made. Further, discussions around using the existing GenICam standard cemented it as the key component in the overall architecture.

The next steps will focus on the creation of a first draft of the standard. This will be a collaborative effort involving most of the participants at the meeting. The final goal is to have a ratified draft by the end of 2012.

Mike Gibbons, Point Grey director of product marketing, commented: ‘The meeting was a great success and we look forward to embracing the USB3 Vision standard once it is ratified,’ adding, ‘all Point Grey's USB 3.0 products will support the new standard.’

USB3 Vision is an upcoming camera interface standard based on USB 3.0. The aim of the standard is to enable interoperability between imaging components such as cameras, accessories and software. Like the popular GigE Vision standard, USB3 Vision will provide a framework for transmitting high-speed video and related control data.

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