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Sofradir to deliver IR detectors for military satellite

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Sofradir, a leading developer and manufacturer of infrared detectors, has been awarded a multi-million Euro contract to manufacture infrared detectors for the MUSIS/CSO Earth observation military satellites. These satellites will replace the current Helios 2 observational system.

Within the framework of the four-year MUSIS/CSO contract, Sofradir will deliver to Thalès Alenia Space France (TAS-F) high resolution custom design IR focal plane arrays for the optical imaging cameras.

'After our successful involvement in the satellites Helios IIA and IIB, launched in 2004 and 2009 respectively, Sofradir is proud to be part of the MUSIS/CSO project and have the continued confidence of the French MoD and TAS,' said Philippe Bensussan, chairman and CEO at Sofradir.

The CSO (Optical Space Component) is the French government's contribution to the future MUSIS (MUltinational Spacebased Imaging System) that will include optical and radar space components. Astrium, a leading aerospace company, is the prime contractor for the CSO satellite development contract. The French space agency CNES awarded the contract to Astrium in 2010. CNES was delegated by the French procurement agency DGA to manage the project.

Sofradir will complete delivery of all the IR detectors by 2015. These are based on the company's Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) technology, a highly complex semiconductor material.

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