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Photron celebrates 40th anniversary

Photron, a global high speed imaging systems and image analysis software manufacturer, has celebrated its 40th anniversary this month in Tokyo at its annual sales and marketing meeting.

Andrew Bridges, Photron's director of sales and marketing, notes: 'We are pleased to announce our 40 years of excellence in the high speed imaging industry. Until 2000, our cameras were "badged" and sold as Kodak products. Since then, our Photron label of high speed digital imaging and image processing software products has helped establish a new world standard in slow motion imaging and analysis.'

Photron is currently garnering international attention for providing high speed, high definition TV imaging to 5,400fps for sporting events during the Beijing 2008 games. Presented with the Crash Test Innovation of the Year award by UK-based Automotive Testing Technology International magazine, the company also received the top honour for Product Excellence in 2008 by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. Photron's ultima APX camera was used in the 2007 Shark attack at dawn high-speed sequence for the BBC's widely acclaimed Planet Earth series and in 2006was integrated into Tech Imaging’s Emmy award-winning SwingVision system for Golf on CBS.

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