Matrox turns 35

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Matrox, of which Matrox Imaging providing component-level solutions for machine vision, image analysis, medical imaging, and video surveillance, is a part, has celebrated its 35th anniversary.

With the introduction of Matrox's first product Video RAM (a specialised video display device for first-generation microcomputers) in 1976, co-founders Branko Matic and Lorne Trottier launched a company that has continued to develop innovative, industry-leading products over the last 35 years. The company's three divisions – Matrox Graphics, Matrox Imaging, and Matrox Video – now provide specialised hardware and software solutions for use in an array of professional markets, including media and entertainment, finance, digital signage, medical imaging, manufacturing, factory automation, security, government, and enterprise computing.

Despite the fast-paced, increasingly complex challenges companies face within the high-technology sector, Matrox continues to deliver reliable, high-quality products aimed at solving specific, real-world industry issues.

Matrox's success is ensured by the calibre of its solutions, commitment to customers' needs, and a willingness to optimise every aspect of its business operations. The company's proven track record assures customers that Matrox will continue to meet their specifications for performance, value, and service now and in the future.

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